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David Franks: Walkabouts Verse

Email: david1franks@yahoo.com
Web: Read samples here, then, perhaps, use http://walkaboutsverse.blogspot.com for all my verses, and http://davidfranks.blogspot.com for all my gigs; also, at http://myspace.com/walkaboutsverse, or here, you may play audio samples...
Twitter: @davidfranks
Updated: 1 day ago
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Biography

Welcome aboard! I'm David Franks, an English poet plus folk & Christian musician; and this site is devoted to my "Weekly WalkaboutsVerse, E.G." plus the 18 recordings, notes and lyrics of my "Chants from Walkabouts" C.D. (links on the right), as well as a couple more poetry samples - with text below, and recordings above, this Biography. WalkaboutsVerse is an abbreviation of my life's work (originally a paperback) "Walkabouts: Travels and Conclusions in Verse" - which, along with info. on the (above-mentioned) related C.D., "Chants from Walkabouts," you may read, for free, via my e-scroll options (linked above); also at these sites, you'll find further links to other things about me (other info on repertoire, other publications and performances, messages, etc.). But here is THE BLURB from WALKABOUTS, and some other abridgment - "ABOUT THE POET AND THE POETRY: David Franks was born and, after a long time away, lives in England. The four-part collection has travels and conclusions, in poems and songs, from his nomadic first-thirty-six years. The experience behind the verse includes shoestring-travel through about forty countries, A-grade junior sport, a B.A. in humanities, four technical certificates in manufacturing, plus several years on the shopfloor. The style is mostly direct; and the substance informative, humorous and didactic." Armed with poems, unaccompanied Chants and E. trads, I began participating in folk and poetry clubs, festivals, and forums during 2004, before beginning to teach myself keyboards and recorders a year later. I've since placed in folk-festival competitions, done a few mini-gigs, recited on radio, and, as suggested above, some WalkaboutsVerse has also been published in journals, etc. In broad summary, then, I travelled and studied in humanities, before writing the verses and finding a way to sing or chant some of them; I learnt (formally and informally) desktop publishing, P.C. recording, as well as other I.T.; and, lastly, I taught myself to read and play music, plus, eventually, to write it by mimicking my singing with the above instruments. Other main interests are - as with many English folk - gardening and tennis (again, use links). P.S: as noted, the following two poems are also on my Audio Sample, above - the first is spoken, and the second (as with all 18 Chants from Walkabouts, here) sung with a tenor-recorder intro. and electronic-keyboard accompaniment; plus, if you like, there are more tracks (including English hymns, folk songs and carols) on my (linked) Myspace...

Samples

(As detailed just above, you may hear both these.) Poem 187 of 230, WalkaboutsVerse (above links): A SOUTH SHIELDS WALKABOUT - AUTUMN 2001 Out of the museum-and-gallery (Wiser on Cookson and the local way), Down Ocean Road with, to the right of me, Its eateries and, left, neat places to stay; Before, on either side, Marine Parks - The southern-one a most beautiful place, Teeming with moorhens, swans, grebes and mallards, In a small lake at a scenic-hill’s base. Then (holding chips from the parade’s cafe And, thus, a flock of gulls squawking above) Onto the South Pier I made my way: Seeing seaweed over rocks - like a glove - And high-and-dry sands, held - from transgression - By growth of grass and the weaving of wood, Plus, in the dim light of a sleepy sun, Fishing boats returning to Tynemouth’s hood. (C) David Franks 2003 2 of 230, WalkaboutsVerse (above links): WALKABOUT WITH MY PEN (TUNE: C2 F3 G1 G3 A1 A3 G1 G3, C2 G3 A1 A3 G1 G3 F1 F3, C2 A3 A1 A3 G1 G3 F1 F3, C2 G2 A2 G2 A2 G2 F2 F3; C2 F3 G1 G3 A1 A3 G1 G3, C2 F3 G1 G3 A1 G1 F1 F3) Once drove an old sedan up north, From a place in Sydney to Cairns; Then to Kuranda I went forth By train, to look without set plans. (Whistle) I browsed through the trendy market, With fresh fruits of tropical kind; Walked to the creek through lush thicket - Nature’s hand giving peace of mind. (Hum) I dined in a scenic cafe; Then, outside, as I wrote for yen, Some passing Kooris called-out: “Hey, You go walkabout with your pen.” (Ooh) Request or question, I don’t know - Assured voices, elderly men. That’s now several years ago, And I’ve seen the world - with my pen. (C) David Franks 2003

All poems are copyright of the originating author. Permission must be obtained before using or performing others' poems.

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Comments

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John Gibson

Sat 31st May 2014 11:33

Liked `Walkabout` Cool..:)

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Tomás Ó Cárthaigh

Tue 29th Apr 2014 00:53

Nice to listen to your readings and music

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Katherine M. Kelly

Tue 1st Mar 2011 01:28

Thank you David for your comment and your thoughts. I will update that poem. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

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Lisa Milligan

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 15:29

Thanks so much for your comments, David! There are a couple others that are lyrics too - if you have time, I'd appreciate it if you checked them out. "Bye Mommy" is one, "Though The Demons Are Waiting" is another and so is "Waves Crash". "Bye Mommy" is in pretty good shape, but the other two probably need work. The rest of my work is mainly free verse.

If not, that's OK too. In any case, thank you for taking the time to comment on "Broken Seashell". Happy New Year!!

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Isobel

Wed 28th Oct 2009 17:25

Thank you muchly David - would rather be responsible for that than a new Ice Age....
Isobel x

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Isobel

Wed 28th Oct 2009 11:12

Stop press - I must confess
I never thought my shoes were less
Important than a climate treaty
So pretty are my little feety...

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David Franks

Thu 22nd Oct 2009 12:23

I myself, Steve, have apologised for the fact that, nowadays, some of my blog-poems may be old-hat for long-term members, such as yourself. Also, for what it's worth, I try to be topical, in terms of current affairs, with some of my "daily ditties."

Melissa R. Mendelson

Fri 4th Sep 2009 23:36

Hi, David. When I first started writing poetry, all my poems rhymed, and only later did I drop the rhyme. I posted an old poem, The Raven as an example.

I hope you have a great weekend.

Melissa

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Isobel

Mon 31st Aug 2009 10:23

I should just add that in performance poetry, issues/language don't jump up and bite you on the bum, like my poem just has. Language is soon heard and soon forgotten. Anything written down is there to be read and reread forever and a day - that is why we all need to be very careful about what we commit to paper. Never argue by mail (as some of my family have) - not easy to forget words that can be refreshed.

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Isobel

Mon 31st Aug 2009 10:08

I don't know David. Perhaps people just want to feel rebellious and naughty sometimes - I know I do. I just feel like venting all my frustrations in some way. Perhaps I should buy a cat, then I could go and kick it. Will probably never write another poem that contains so many swear words - it was just a phase I was going through - probably cos I knew someone at the time who swore a lot - it must have rubbed off.

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David Franks

Mon 31st Aug 2009 10:04

But why is there so much swearing, and shock tactics, in "performance poetry"?

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Isobel

Mon 31st Aug 2009 09:49

Sorry if I've offended you with my recent poem David. I try never to swear in front of my children and only rarely in poetry. This was written primarily as a performance piece, not for page. I tend to perform only in pubs where the audience is largely inebriated and accepting of all forms of language. I do take your point.

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Michèle Vassal

Fri 21st Aug 2009 12:05

Thank you for dropping by...Yes you can hear me read(with Brendan Ring on uilleann pipes and clairseach), check the audio clip and also one myspace page!

maipenrai

Wed 19th Aug 2009 19:18

Spot on mate it is Thai, lived there for some years.
Bernie

Yolande

Sun 16th Aug 2009 17:17

Hello David. Thankyou for commenting on my poem. I can see by your prolific output that poerty is an integral part of your life, reflecting your life's journey. Regards Yolande.

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Dave D Poet Rhumour

Wed 12th Aug 2009 19:14

Hi David - thanks for dropping by to leave me a comment, much appreciated

Best wishes

Dave

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Sarah Cowther

Mon 10th Aug 2009 17:55

Thanks for your comment.
I like your 'Walkabout' idea, you really paint a picture.

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winston plowes

Thu 6th Aug 2009 20:59

Hi David, Glad you liked 'Windows'. I am getting some material together for a childrens book so look out for more daftness to come! Win

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Isobel

Mon 6th Jul 2009 12:19

Thanks for taking the time to read David. I think you read one of the few that I wrote in free rhyme - LOL! Like you, I do like to rhyme and found it hard breaking the habit. Free verse does gove you a lot of freedom over the language you use though which can't be a bad thing. Till we meet again.
Isobel x

Hannah Eve

Tue 24th Feb 2009 09:58

thanks for the comment, glad you enjoyed it. x

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Belinda Johnston

Mon 2nd Feb 2009 12:16

Hi David,

I have visited Kyoto, Tokyo and many other places in Japan, and there are still many places to cover. I hope to do some more travelling in Asia, whilst living in Japan.

Excuse me for asking, but what do you mean by, Trad and Metre? I am only just starting to develop my form and style in writing poetry and any new terminology still kind of throws me.

Many thanks for your encouraging words. Bel

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garside

Thu 15th Jan 2009 11:39

Hi David - thanks for taking the time to read my work

steve : )

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Sam Kellaway

Wed 7th Jan 2009 11:39

David

Thank you for your comment. It is suppose to have that feel to it but I do not always succeed in getting the stressed/unstressed syllables to meet the iambic rules that my english teacher told me to disregard! Other than that it is a narrrative poem that has a thought to be heard. You should read the 'hoodie' poem, it has a little more rhythm to it.

Regards
Sam

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Daniel Hooks

Wed 3rd Sep 2008 15:53

Thanks David I am glad you like my poems!

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clarissa mckone

Sun 31st Aug 2008 04:45

HI David, thanks for the kind words. What part of Mexico did you get to see? take care Clarissa

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the other woman

Thu 31st Jul 2008 22:17

Thanks David for the comment.
hope you enjoy my myspace site.
i'm still learning all this, so some are better than others. i'll keep practicing!!!!
thanks
woman

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David Franks

Tue 22nd Jul 2008 18:17

To Carol: I just re-tried and it worked okay...but it's also on myspace if you'd like to use the above link.

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carol falaki

Tue 22nd Jul 2008 10:59

Hi David, thanks for your kind comment. I have tried to open your adio sample above but its not working on my computer.

Sophie Parkes

Tue 22nd Jul 2008 10:05

Thanks for your comment! Air Cav's actually a psychedelic indie band but I do play folk too.

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sarah clark

Tue 8th Jul 2008 22:43

nice writing, with ur poetry i feel like im there with u..if that makes sence

sez x

thanx for the comment

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