Nan´s Kitchen

Nan´s Kitchen

 

The kitchen was small and austere

an old sink with a single tap

for cold water alone

The window was draped in a net curtain

beside the sink an old gas stove

with four burners and an oven

Opposite stood a kitchenette

and little else that served any purpose

Linoleum covered the wooden floor

which was cracked and threadbare

In the corner behind a door was the pantry

with several shelves and packets of food

On the floor a bucket with milk bottles

standing in cold water

Cheese and butter on a marble slab

covered with a gauze canopy

A solitary light bulb with no shade

gave a stark quality to the room

It was functional, mothing more

bare and inhospitable where

I ate bread and dripping sitting on the doorstep

with Yippie Nan´s dog

From the door step to my right

I could see next door neighbour´s air aid shelter

and asked Nan

why she didn´t have one

I´d rather die in bed, she replied

◄ Loathing

You´re Living in the Past ►

Comments

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Jon

Mon 28th Oct 2019 14:45

Very similar in many ways to our kitchen growing up...the pantry, or larder, the functionality a far cry from today's high spec affairs.
A great ending too with plenty dry humour...or resolve?... from your Nan
Love it

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keith jeffries

Tue 8th Oct 2019 12:03

Kevin, Don, Lisa, Marina, Ray and MC.,

Thank you all for your comments which I greatly appreciate.

Keith

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raypool

Mon 7th Oct 2019 12:15

Good work Keith. Simple, direct and down to earth. There is much impact in presenting truth in this way. People would see this scenario as depressing today, but it was common practice, and provided only the basics of comfort. Where did we go so wrong (or right) according to taste. The last lines are highly relevant.

Ray

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M.C. Newberry

Sun 6th Oct 2019 16:43

Right-on. It's so easy for folk like me (war baby!) to overlook what we
experienced as kids in the bosom of generations who had little to
make live comfortable or convenient and just got on to make do with
what they had/could afford - surely even more appreciative as a result when things looked up and their lives enjoyed the occasional
"luxury" (describing much that is taken for granted nowadays).
Austerity was known back then and its reality took the form of Ration books and skinny kids who went to school with darned socks!

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kJ Walker

Sat 5th Oct 2019 21:48

there's a fear I might sound like one of Monty Python's "Four Yorkshiremen" when I say this, but that's exactly how I remember my own childhood home.
I can remember my mum having to unplug the light to plug the iron into the socket. then having to iron on the twilight.

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