Biography

On Modern Love, published with Flipped Eye 2011: Modern Love - originally the title of George Meredith's 1862 book of 16-line sonnets, thenceforth known as Meredithian sonnets - looks to trace the year-long course of a passion as echoed through contemporary manners and languages such as texting and Facebook. The subject may, of course, equally be filed under desire, need, obsession, ecstasy, insecurity and fear, but then these are the chapters of the discourse of love. Inventive and intense at best, the discourse here has an urgency that refuses to settle. George Szirtes Modern Love presents love absent of all its Hollywood romanticism. It's visceral, liminal, alcoholic and all the more romantic for it. Disturbingly sublime. Popshot Magazine Max Wallis shows that modern love is the same as love ever was. The heart beats in the same way, the silences, kisses and stillnesses shared by lovers are as they ever were, ever will be. Helen Ivory – The Breakfast Machine – Bloodaxe Max Wallis' Modern Love is a year long cycle of youthful love and its twists and turns. He mixes everyday images with tight observation and flashes of beautiful observation as metaphors of entanglement. Hope brightens, then drops its hand as the cycle moves into the gentle melancholy of loss and not knowing. John Siddique - Full Blood – Salt Max Wallis is inventive, playful and moving by turns, and unflinchingly honest in his writing. Language is both a toy and a knife to him. Modern Love takes the reader through a love affair and does so beautifully, tellingly and adventurously. There is so much here to identify with and to praise. Angela Topping – The New Generation/I Sing of Bricks – Salt A beautiful chap on chapbook. There is no predictive text here from Max Wallis. Tony Walsh Absolutely breathtaking. Jo Bell Unspeakably beautiful. Rachel McGladdery, winner of the John Lennon Poetry Competition 2010 Has the corner on love poetry. Dorothy Fryd – Canterbury Poet Of The Year 2009 'Intricacy, delicacy, sensitivity and porn are just some of the people who populate the ever intriguing writings of Max Wallis. Here we have a risk-taker whose imagination is as able as his talent. One of the most exciting young poets in quite some time.' Gerry Potter (a.k.a. Chloe Poems) 'Rather brilliant.' Pam Leeson 'Best young poet of the year ... magical.' Dominic Berry, Queer Vegan Poet 'Truthful, tearful, sexy and ambitious - Max Wallis' is a powerful voice full of Northern pride and passion.' Jo Bell, director of National Poetry Day. 'Max Wallis is taking the word by storm.' Tony Walsh 'Best thing to come out of Chorley since the A6.' Paul Neads, Flapjack Press 'Vivid, exciting, insightful and slinky.' Jackie Hagan

All poems are copyright of the originating author. Permission must be obtained before using or performing others' poems.

Audio entries by Max Wallis

For Hope (13/04/2010)

For When the Wind Sighs + Audio (10/04/2010)

For Dicks (30/03/2010)

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Comments

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Charlotte Henson

Sun 1st Jan 2012 17:00

Hey, I was just wondering how old you are. As a young poet with an anthology released, I find you inspirational :)

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Isobel

Sat 8th May 2010 16:06

Hi Max - it was lovely to meet you also. I can now officially declare you to be a 'real' person with a complexion I would die for! You are very talented and your poetry is mature, which had left a few of us wondering.
Look forward to meeting you at a future gig.
Isobel x

<Deleted User> (7212)

Tue 27th Apr 2010 23:36

Hi Max - chapbooks - at the risk of boring you stiff with my opinions, I'll give it a shot anyway & hope you dont take offence. Excepting folks like eg JK Rowling, the average writer makes an annual income of £8K pa whereas the average pay for a Teacher of creative writing is around £40K pa - depressing yes? Poets BTW earn way way below that of the average writer. If you want some advice ?? here it is. My business turnover is ~ £1 million (which these days is not a lot) but we are just opening a new factory as well in the US & expanding out into Europe. We've been going 22 yrs. We work in an extremely small niche market which, to me at any rate, is the way to go these days. You dont want an enterprise where you have a lot of competition. I dont know what your other interests & strengths are, but I would think hard about what you are passionate or at least very knowledgeable about & do that. A guy who worked for me left to make handmade plastic chesspieces - er, no - the chinese can do that for 100th of the price. If you were talented & maybe doing them in solid gold... maybe a different matter. Another thing is that if you watch dragons den everyone thinks you need a bank/investor loan of £100K which is bollocks - I started off with nothing & built very slowly. The hard part is having the idea - it does not need to be a new invention, but you do need to specialize - and be aware that working for yourself is very hard work indeed, but can also pay way better than working for anyone else. for example - my brother in law prints & sells unique/arty Tshirts on the net from london & makes about £30K - not great but easy to do & not too shabby money-wise. I'm just trying to reiterate that publishing poetry is not the route to riches - unless you can maybe think of a unique way of doing it?? I hope I've not bored you too much. all the best. B

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Louise Fazackerley

Fri 23rd Apr 2010 20:24

hey,

i love your poems-just been looking at your blog- and your voice has a nice timbre too. are you based in the north-west?

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Rachel McGladdery

Sat 17th Apr 2010 12:00

Cheers Max and well done on the Uni offer too, Dad is a true story.
x

<Deleted User> (7075)

Thu 1st Apr 2010 13:33

Welcme to the site Max... interesting stuff already! Winston

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Rachel McGladdery

Sun 28th Mar 2010 15:47

Hey Max, great to see you on here
rach
x

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