THE GHOST OF THE GHOST OF REES McGINN

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The dark was all-pervading with barely breath or sound

No place to be for vermin, less colliers underground.

They haunched beside the ripping lip, their cap lamps set to ‘dim’

And waited till the Chargie spoke, so soft and low and grim.

‘It’s here they say they’ve seen him glowing in the dark,

Floating outbye 7’s, his tortured face so stark.

He curses at his comrades as through the dust they crawl;

He swears that they abandoned him beneath that heavy fall.’

The lad with false bravado snorted in his snap

‘An old wives’ tale and if it’s true’ he said, ‘I’ll eat my cap’.

The Chargie stared in silence and with all the calm he had

He turned to his old Ripper and bid him, ‘Tell the lad.

You’ve seen him here yourself.” The ripper lifted up his head.

He shivered, hoiked and spat his phlegm, and this is what he said.

“The dark was all-pervading with barely breath or sound

No place to be for vermin, less colliers underground.

They haunched beside the ripping lip, their cap lamps set to ‘dim’

And waited till the Chargie spoke, so soft and low and grim.

‘It’s here they say they’ve seen him glowing in the dark,

Floating outbye 7’s, his tortured face so stark.

He curses at his comrades as through the dust they crawl;

He swears that they abandoned him beneath that heavy fall.’

The lad with false bravado snorted in his snap

‘An old wives’ tale and if it’s true’ he said, ‘I’ll eat my cap’.”

The Chargie stared in silence and with all the calm he had

He turned to his old ripper and bid him, ‘Tell the lad.

You’ve seen him here yourself.” The ripper lifted up his head.

He shivered, hoiked and spat his phlegm, and this is what he said.

“The dark was all-pervading with barely breath or sound

No place to be for vermin, less colliers underground.

They haunched beside the ripping lip, their cap lamps set to ‘dim’

And waited till the Chargie spoke, so soft and low and grim.

‘It’s here they say they’ve seen him glowing in the dark,

Floating outbye 7’s, his tortured face so stark.

He curses at his comrades as through the dust they crawl;

He swears that they abandoned him beneath that heavy fall.’

The lad with false bravado snorted in his snap

‘An old wives’ tale and if it’s true’ he said, ‘I’ll eat my cap’.

                     The Chargie stared in silence and with all the calm he had

He turned to his old Ripper and bid him, ‘Tell the lad.

You’ve seen him here yourself.” The ripper lifted up his head.

He shivered, hoiked and spat his phlegm, and this is what he said........”

◄ UPSKIRTING 2

CROSSROADS MOTEL ►

Comments

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John Coopey

Mon 8th Oct 2018 18:43

Coalfaces were numbered, MC. T21’s,B7’s etc. Inbye and outbye were terms designating if a location away from or towards the pit bottom.

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M.C. Newberry

Mon 8th Oct 2018 16:08

Then you're in good (albeit ghostly) company!
Forgot to ask - what is meant by "Floating outbye 7's"?
Not a phrase I know.

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John Coopey

Mon 8th Oct 2018 16:01

I thought Jim Reeves was “ The Man with the Dark Brown Voice”, MC.

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M.C. Newberry

Mon 8th Oct 2018 15:56

JC's "dark brown" tones are ideal for the haunting material -
well put over.

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John Coopey

Sun 7th Oct 2018 23:58

Thankyou, Martin.

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Martin Elder

Sun 7th Oct 2018 22:22

This is a beautiful old folk tale/ song you have written here John

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John Coopey

Sun 7th Oct 2018 21:46

Thanks, Taylor. Glad it reached to you.

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Taylor Crowshaw

Sun 7th Oct 2018 19:58

Brilliant poem John just my cup of tea. I do not dissect poems on their technical merit. I just know what touches me and this certainly connected with me. Thank you..?

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