Sunset Over Lupset (August 1968)

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Sunset Over Lupset (August 1968)

 

Lupset sunsets smelled of bonfires,

undercut with new mown grass,

wild mint by the kitchen window,

treasures in the strawberry patch.

 

Father sat with pint of shandy,

The mower cooling in the shade,

the rake stowed by the garden shed,

the kids with sparkling lemonade.

 

Summer sun dips on the estate

dragging shadows from the coal hole. 

Bird song muffled in humid air

that blankets sweat and soothes the soul.

 

Sounds of mother in the kitchen

putting salad onto our plates -

ham and cheese and egg and lettuce,

simple food that invigorates.

 

The summer heat is at its height,

the windows and doors open wide

to let the air move through the house

where sleeping bodies will be fried.

 

A memory of summers past

before the world stole all our dreams,

where simple things dealt us pleasure -

cold Council pop and Lumb’s ice creams.

 

Families sitting in back yards,

talking together, having fun,

perfect end to an August week

when debts were paid and work was done.

childhoodcouncil estatefamilygardeninghomesummer

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Comments

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Ian Whiteley

Wed 16th May 2018 14:49

thanks for the 'likes' good folk 😃

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raypool

Fri 11th May 2018 21:45

A perfect example of how rhyming simple lines makes us feel good and satisfied. Thank goodness for the Betjemanesque soliloquys of the past. May nostalgia thrive forever Ian. I like the fact that the last two lines give that sense of security we have now largely lost in the workplace. We've always had capitalists, but in that world of social values they never falsely raised our hopes, nor pretended to set us free.

Ray

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keith jeffries

Fri 11th May 2018 18:23

Ian,
thank you for this poem which speaks of a very English idyll. It is perfectly rhymed and takes the reader directly to the place you have so eloquently described, both now and on many occasions in the past. Well done and thank you again.
Keith

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