COUNTING SHEEP

Rest time at bed time is not always the best time 

When I can't sleep.. they say to count sheep 

 

But my sheep don't help me  they keep me awake 

My eyes scared to close incase my soul they take 

I know it's an exercise to rest one's mind

My sheep in my head are not very kind 

 

I try to count them jump as they say 

Some of them run in the opposite way 

 

Some are too small and jump and clash heads

They're cut and they're bleeding and white wool turns red 

It's sad and frustrating and I'm unable to help 

Instead of the baa sound these sheep scream and yelp 

 

The big ones are mean and they ram with their horns 

They kill all the weak ones and hurt the new borns 

Then after hours of those graphic scenes 

I slip in to sleep land for horrific dreams

 

I'm scared and I'm lonely and can not get out 

And no sound will come out as I try to shout 

 

I'm fighting and losing my body inactive 

I feel hopeless and paranoid and so unattractive 

 

Bed times surrounded with dark dreads and fears 

I dont always remember but wake saddened in tears 

 

Other times I'm drifting feels like I'm watched 

Night sweats and terrors oh when will this stop 

 

Sleep time for others for granted they take 

The best thing bout sleep time is when I awake

ADHDdream poetryinsomnianight terrorsnightmare

◄ CAROUSEL

TRUST ►

Comments

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Angel whisperer indigo child x

Mon 19th Apr 2021 14:27

M.C.NEWBERRY Thankyou very much for that insight xx

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M.C. Newberry

Fri 16th Apr 2021 15:09

Sleep can be a mixed blessing. We all have our experiences of
its effects through the extraordinary ongoing activity of the brain conjuring up various images, some often pretty frightening, that
accompany our night hours and can remain vivid even after we
wake up. The reassuring part is that at least it provides us with
physical rejuvenation to get us by day by day. Much study has been applied to dreams. A notable case I read about concerned
a famous British classical music composer who lost his brother in
WW1, a conflict in which he himself had participated. For years
he suffered horrible dreams and eventually found that by diverting
his mind into music as a memento of his dead brother, he was
"freed" from the anguish of his nighttime torments. Almost as if
the brain had accepted his activity as a cure for what it had been
suffering for so long. No wonder the brain remains a fascinating
subject for medical science and that we still know so little of how
and why it works. Peace of mind: now THAT is something you
can't put a price on!

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