Yesterdays Post

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The seasonal grind

through the gears

the autumn now

of working fears.

 

But what to do

when pension nears

as money’s tight

and mortgage rears?

 

The posties wife

she knew his mind

twenty years posting time;

but the wheels were falling off.

 

He chased the debts

with gambling ways

and soon she learnt 

that better days;

would not come home to roost.

 

The heartbreak came with bitter tears

to part now after many years,

the one thing left that sadly binds her

no love letter-  

                         just a final reminder.

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Comments

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Chris Co

Wed 18th Jan 2012 20:40

Thx for all the comments/feedback- appreciated.

Sorry to hear of the sad connection Gray.

The poem came out of reading too many sad stories in various newspapers. Modern times, economics and pressures resulting in Human failings. Situations that occurred a little too often to simply be called anecdotal.

I suppose if you've worked hard and honestly all your life. If you have lived the life that politicians venerate and extol; only to find out that the pension has been pissed away by corporate gamblers. If you then come to realize that your retirement is lurking, waiting to ambush you and take away everything you have strived for throughout your life...Well if that happens, it is easy to see how under such pressure people will make mistakes, hide debts, chase and try and recapture the dream, the always pictured retirement etc.

I see both people in this as victims who themselves become yesterdays post, yesterdays news.

Glad you think it concludes well Steve- it's the best part of the poem in my opinion.

Hi Jane- I agree that she probably did what she needed to do given the breakdown in the relationship. And clearly he made mistakes, the biggest one in betraying her trust by hiding the problems. It's not fiction is it? I mean it is something we have all read about. We have all heard of couples falling apart like this. Glad you liked the last verse.

Hey John, glad you like- ta. The last lines are actually 2 lines-feminine ending tetrameter and pentameter respectively. The lay out on the page is just to hide the ending around the corner. It's a combination that has been used quite a bit. Maybe the layout causes a jagged edge?

G.Nichol- Glad you feel the poem worked for you- thx.

I found out today that the poem has been published in a magazine called
'The Merseysider' in part of an article on poetry (hey! :) The magazine is available at The Tate galley Liverpool, all the Liverpool museums and will soon be available via Smiths newsagents and possibly Tesco.

Chris

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Gray Nicholls

Tue 17th Jan 2012 22:51

like the use of short lines here, Chris but it's a top piece in my mind totally

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John Coopey

Tue 17th Jan 2012 19:36

Good stuff, Chris.
I'm a bit less certain than SB about the final line, though. The cadence if it seems to hiccup a bit - that's me being picky!
Give me a crack on the nose when we meet next.

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jane wilcock

Mon 16th Jan 2012 22:29

I think this is really funny. She's doing the right thing!Sorry if it should have more tragic elememts but I think she's got ir right. The last verse is just great!

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Poets Corner

Mon 16th Jan 2012 14:40

Nice one Chris..I like the reference to 'the Seasonal grind through the gears' and 'what to do when pension nears'..'gambling ways' and the potential lack of those 'better days'...Yes! it's my kind of poem Chris.. as it reminds me of the grief of growing up as a child with an alcoholic, aggressive father who spent and gambled our family money away, whilst my dear Mother worried how to pay bills and provide food and school uniforms for us! (desperate times had)...
As one of my poems says ' Oh the grief and sorrow...all my brother and I could hope for (in those post war years and fears) was a far better tomorrow! (Happy days eh mate)...beautifully written Chris!
My Bests - Graham

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