Equally bad (AKA Rantings of an antisexist man in a post-feminist world)


I may be a mister,
But sisters don’t get pissed yeah when I say in fact - I, am a feminist.
There seems to me to be a need for us to celebrate and debate the culture of nurture over greed,
Which appears an instinctively natural part of so many a female’s nature.
Maybe its origins historically are biological,
Isn’t it simple, obvious and logical,
That of the human races pair of parental partners
The very best gardeners tend not to be the human seed planters,
But instead, the seed tenders, the inside lending, DNA blenders,
Who, to bear a child, must share all that they have, all that they are,
Carrying a new life force in a physical pact that is still genuinely gender particular?

Now this is not a tract based on womb envy,
as what I want to celebrate goes way beyond that.
It’s vital not to see this as a simple transgender pat on the back
Because these important qualities have gone from being undervalued, to being under attack.
Some seem to want these special skills from us divided,
So much so that men who show these qualities of consideration and kindness
are too often derided  by guys and girls should show that they know better,
While young ladies become laddettes, painting their life pictures from palettes tainted
As they ape all that is vile and uncouth from the landscape of our modern male youth.

Equal but different were the targets for us I guess somewhere we must have lost focus,
In chasing dreams of equity
We came to be more equal but crucially
We became indifferent to the importance of difference.
Instead, the hard drinking, pint sinking, self serving, status quo preserving,
aggression and violence of masculinity,
Came to be promoted as a better choice for you & me
than what might be described inarticulately as more feminine qualities,
In transactions of word, powerful projection is asserted
as the only way to make sure that you’re heard,
Thus listening is lost as a skill,
our conversations become nothing more than confrontational battles of will.
Sorry but it’s folly, ‘cos if we’re aiming for fairer,
Why do we make the meek into bullies when we need more carers.


Our sexual revolution is no completed history - for me her story is at best half done.
For although heartfelt and hard fought were the battles that have been won,
If I am not going mad,
It seems the equal that we have so far become
Is simply equally bad.

 

equalityfeminismgenderpolitics

◄ A why is...

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Comments

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Laura Taylor

Fri 13th Sep 2013 14:52

Hehe :) :)

Nice one again, chuck

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Fri 13th Sep 2013 12:00

I knew you'd like that line ;)

It was what I originally meant, but just said better at least in part thanks to our discussion.

Constructive criticism can lead to progress after all!

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Laura Taylor

Fri 13th Sep 2013 11:50

Haha - phew - that was some debate eh Mark?! On fire! :D

Anyhoo, not got much time but I will say this...this line is very definitely improved:

"than what might be described inarticulately as more feminine qualities"

and that the rest of that verse is also much improved on the first.

Nice one :)

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Wed 11th Sep 2013 23:21

Here's the original I've edit the piece above so that is now the 2013 redraft...

I may be a mister,

But sister, don’t get pissed yeah when I say in fact - I, am a feminist.

There seems to me to be a need for us to celebrate and debate the culture of nurture over greed,

Which appears an instinctively natural part of almost each and every female’s nature.

Maybe its origins historically are biological,

Isn’t it simple, obvious and logical,

That of the human races pair of parental partners

The very best gardeners tend not to be the human seed planters,

But instead, the seed tenders, the inside lending, DNA blenders,

Who, to bear a child, must share all that they have, all that they are,

Carrying a new life force in a physical pact that is still genuinely gender particular?



Now this is not a tract based on womb envy, because what I want to celebrate goes way beyond that.

It’s vital not to see this as a simple transgender pat on the back

Because these important female qualities have gone from being undervalued, to being under attack.

Some seem to want these special skills from us divided,

So much so that men who show these qualities of consideration, kindness and care are derided

Almost everywhere by guys and girls should show that they know better,

While young ladies become laddettes, painting their life pictures from palettes tainted

As they ape all that is vile and uncouth from the landscape of our modern male youth.



Equal but different were the targets for us I guess somewhere we must have lost focus,

In chasing dreams of equity

We came to be more equal but crucially

We became indifferent to the importance of difference.

Instead, the hard drinking, pint sinking, self serving, status quo preserving, aggression and violence of masculinity,

Came to be promoted as a better choice for you & me than the more feminine quality of equanimity,

In transactions of word, powerful projection is asserted as the only way to make sure that you’re heard,

Thus listening is lost as a skill, our conversations become nothing more than confrontational battles of will.



Our sexual revolution is no completed history - for me her story is at best half done.

For although heartfelt and hard fought were the battles that have been won,

If I am not going mad,

It seems the equal that we have so far become

Is simply equally bad.

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Laura Taylor

Fri 7th Jan 2011 10:01

Mark

Can promise you that I haven't removed any of my own posts so not sure what's happened there! Can you remember what it said cos I can't!

Anyhoo, that's by the by. Thank you for your reply, it's well considered, and I've actually really enjoyed this exchange :)

Yes, well, I think the tendency is that people always will approach these issues from an initially subjective position. Interesting that you too (and your mum) have experienced the gender confusion thing - people thinking you are not a man (and I like your self-reference as a boy there!). I accept what you are saying re positive qualities - I just object to them being linked to the 'feminine' I guess. It is a good idea to raise awareness of them - but also to do that with the aim that we can all be everything and anything. But we have to start somewhere, and without the springboards of the concepts already handed to us, then where else do we start?

I also happen to think that anger and aggression do not always have to be negative; although in a lot of cases they are, I have found my own internal anger to be a driving force in my life, not something that eats away at me, or causes damage to others...just something that, if I were without it, I might have just lain down and died by now.

Cheers - thanks for the debate :)

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Thu 6th Jan 2011 21:10

The first post you made on this thread has disappeared.

The nature vs nurture discussion is a lot older than us. I think a lot of people approach it with issues relating to their own life experience which can prevent them from seeing that generalities exist or make them fight harder to disprove things that are generally accepted.

The whole people behaving in ways that don't conform, I will always remember the day I was asked if my Mum was my older brother... I have experienced it first hand too, my sensitive nature leading to accusations that I wasn't a man (I always intended on staying a boy as they were less offensive).

I guess that what I am asking people to consider is whether we missed the point, that actually equality is about recognising the positive qualities that are undervalued in society, many of which have been associated with the concept of femininity, and raise their value in terms of social importance and economic value.

Is this not a good idea? Is it not in the poem?

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Laura Taylor

Thu 6th Jan 2011 11:00

Hi Mark

Oh well, we seem to have reached a mexican stand off. I don't feel that you replied adequately to my points at all either. Perhaps this has occurred due to us approaching the issues from different points - I have come at it from an admittedly quite dry academic level, having studied Feminisms as part of my degree, and also from a personal level, having come up against endless barriers in life due purely to being born female. It is something I am intensely interested in, surprise surprise! I think we are both so focussed on our own approaches that it may be obstructing our views of each others.

I put Radical re your mum in capitals because I was really surprised, and emphasised it to gain clarification. It's just that I've come across people using the term radical to mean something different to the original feminist theory definition. I was surprised because feminisms are so diverse these days that I didn't understand why someone would continue to hold to that definition/theory when it is such a separatist movement.

Which first post? On here or mine? I haven't edited anything.

Okay, well, I don't usually go in for explanations, as already mentioned on my poem, but for the purposes of this debate I will. Firstly, it is a haiku, which should contain some enigma/ambiguity. It is a play on a playstation game (Hierarchy Two - which sounds like a game's title), which sprang from the idea of replicating hierarchies within Radical Feminism. It is also about how we as a (Western) society are presented from birth (well it actually exists before we are born) with a binary gender agenda. The expectations are there from birth - we are dressed in certain colours, bought certain toys, told how 'that is not ladylike', or 'boys don't cry' (just examples off the top of my head, and ones which I myself was exposed to). Boys are not usually given dolls to play with, nor are they 'allowed' to wear 'feminine' clothes. Girls 'should' wear dresses, and not be confrontational - or 'feisty' (a word only ever applied to girls and women).

We are presented with these two concepts of what it is to be masculine and feminine, and anything outside of that is considered an 'exception', or not 'normal'. You can't be both, or neither, you have to fit into one, or be considered deviant. We are told how to behave and are controlled by the concepts. Try walking down the street in a dress and see how you are treated. I have been mistaken for being a bloke more times than I can remember, and I think it has something to do with having short hair, not wearing frocks, or much make up, and maybe something to do with how I stand/walk. I am somehow 'lacking' in 'feminine' qualities which give people the clues to who I am.

The Arrow Circle Cross verse has 3 layers. First, the symbols of male and female, with the female one being a circle with a cross attached, the male a circle with an arrow. All of these symbols may also be found on a playstation handset, in a slightly different set up. There is also an alchemical element to them in that they are also symbols of copper (female) and iron (male). They are all representative, as are the terms we have been discussing.

What I'm trying to say is that the generalisations I have used are in there to show how they actually come from above - the powers/authority that actually GIVE us the game, who tell us how to play it. And people do use the terms masculine and feminine all the time, without really thinking about how they define us...how we just accept an authoritative definition of who we are, based solely on firstly our sex, and then using that to shape our genders. In one way, you could say that your poem highlights this, but in another you yourself are using and accepting the terms. Just because hard-drinking etc has been associated with 'masculine' behaviour, does not mean that it is inherently 'masculine' to do this. It might just be that some girls like to drink a lot, or show aggression. It doesn't necessarily mean that they are replicating anything, just that women do have more social freedom these days, and more financial independence.

Therefore, this game is given to us, and we think we are playing it. But we're not using our definitions or rules, we're using someone else's, so it is US that is being played.

The last line is a reference to a film, This Sporting Life, in which the main character is given status purely for his 'masculine' quality of aggression on the rugby pitch. It ultimately destroys him, but it is what gains him acceptance by society.

I use those generalisations to make my point. So instead of accepting them, it questions them, puts the spotlight on them, and shows how we are played. Ultimately, it's a comment on the concepts and how we use and are used by them. In bringing attention to it, you can then begin to question it, and perhaps start to chip away at the edifice a little.

I understand that we use the terms masculine and feminine all the time, but we only use them because they are already in existence. We wouldn't be having this debate if the concepts had not been laid down for us to follow in the first place.

You are right - who IS bringing the later feminist discourses into general debate? No one. That's part of the problem.

It's my belief that no one should feel nervous about discussing and debating these issues. This has been really interesting, if a little frustrating for us both.

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Wed 5th Jan 2011 23:29

To be honest Laura you have been merely frustrating not offensive in the slightest.

I felt that I responded to clarify pretty straight forwardly, but you failed to acknowledge any of my points.

When I went and looked at your piece I was quite amused that many of your complaints could be levelled at your work. However I wouldn't be facetious enough to suggest that you can't make a point with phrases that could be considered generalised and outdated. That I would leave to you!

Interestingly your first post seems to have mysteriously disappeared and I might suggest a little editing may have occurred elsewhere, which makes your argument look a lot more reasonable. Although, you have left in the bit where you question whether I know how my mother describes herself with an interesting use of capitalisation.

Would a comment of surprise have been less challenging and open to accusations of an arrogant and patronising tone?

;o)

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Isobel

Wed 5th Jan 2011 22:58

I think we sometimes take the written word - in fact the spoken word also - far too seriously. The hard thing about the written word is that it IS just that - recorded forever more to be mulled and chewed over. If we get the nuance slightly wrong we are crucified forever and a day. It does make one wary about saying anything lest you should offend. Which is rather a pity since that means bottling up vague feelings that you have which may just be at odds with what others feel. Often we only firm up what we believe by discussing it...

I'm always saying things that get up people's nose - being on the whole an opinionated person. I don't expect to bend anyone to my way of thinking though - nor do I take offence if someone else thinks differently. I'm hopeful that we are all basically like that - it's just the flat medium of the internet that makes it difficult to communicate without seeming to argue.

What I would hate to see is a society where you can't express yourself without being labelled as something with an 'ist' or 'ic' on the end of it. So many steer clear of 'discussions' like this for fear of that.

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Banksy

Wed 5th Jan 2011 22:29

Fuck !! - where's Isobel when you need her ??

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Laura Taylor

Wed 5th Jan 2011 14:57

Hi Mark

Shame, would have been really interesting to see your anal rebuttal! :D

Of course I understand that THIS IS A POEM. But, you welcomed and encouraged debate about it - specifically 'ideological critique'. However, I now get the sense that you are more than a little unhappy with my contributions, and seem to be taking this personally (hence your comment on my latest poem).

I don't state opinions as facts when I debate, as that is not real debate. Which of my 'opinions' do you believe I state as 'facts', out of interest?

I find your reference to my contributions as 'masculine arrogance' really quite interesting.

Please feel free to ignore or Big Red X me - I genuinely do not wish to cause offence, merely to discuss.

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Wed 5th Jan 2011 14:01

I think I have responded, I did start an anal point by point rebuttal, then remembered THIS IS A POEM which I feel needs to be considered in it's context as a whole. Phrase by phrase, out of context (particularly in reference to time and tense) is just nonsensical. I also felt that most of your points were fairly similar and that I could avoid repetition by responding to the theme.

I think you have stated a lot of opinions as fact, where as I tend not to do this as I think it smacks of a very masculine arrogance, we have noted that neither of us believes in conforming to gender stereotypes so perhaps I shouldn't be surprised.

Referencing outdated concepts is different to supporting them, understanding that a phrase can echo a historical meaning and having a wider one is a concept that you fail to understand or choose not to acknowledge.

Whether in the world you inhabit these concepts are outmoded or not, trust me they are alive and well (unfortunately in some cases in my opinion) elsewhere and I witness them virtually everyday, in people far younger than you and I (I work a lot in schools).

The reality is see is that for fear of causing offence, most people, let alone men, feel nervous to even express an opinion on these issues, much less enter into an active debate, which surely can't be good for anyone.

You acknowledge the import of the late twentieth century feminist movement, but who is bringing these discussions in to contemporary culture, popular or otherwise?

At least I have tried and anything as subjective as this is could never please everyone.

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Laura Taylor

Wed 5th Jan 2011 11:22

Hi Mark

Well, you did say that you welcomed an ideological critique. I have provided one on request, but you don't appear to have addressed many of my points.

Clearly this is a poem and not an essay. And yes, subjectivity is an integral aspect of poetry. I am not of the school of thought that believes men cannot be feminists - that truly is Rad Fem ideology.

No, I am not applying interpretations that are out-dated, that speciality remains within the poem ;)

I didn't think you WERE trying to convince me of your opinion as such - just that I disagree, for reasons already outlined, with a lot of the content of the poem. This subject is very close to my heart after having spent a large part of my life not being 'allowed' to do what I wanted to in many areas of life, specifically because I am female, and 'should behave' in certain ways, so I find it impossible not to react. I feel the same way about boys and men being boxed in, fenced off, only 'allowed' to behave in certain ways. You have experienced this yourself. I just think it is much more liberating to think differently, to treat binary notions as a recipe not to be followed blindly. We share all of these 'qualities' - why should we only be allowed to follow one set of rules? Boys don't cry? They do though, don't they?

If this was written purely to spark debate, then I would say you have been successful ;D

Enjoyed the debate :)


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Banksy

Tue 4th Jan 2011 18:30

Isobel -"I would agree that men have great qualities also - let me scratch my head while I think of one ;-)"- we have dicks - does that not count as one ? :D
(well, one dick each, to be accurate)

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Tue 4th Jan 2011 18:15

Hi Laura,

Can a poem be critiqued differently to an essay? I believe so, especially when it frequently makes it clear that the statements contained are subjective (see language like seems, tend, appears, I guess). For me subjectivity and poetry are intrinsically linked, but I would state that as a personal opinion. I even question my own sanity in to the bargain! Essays I would say, need more balance and objectivity, the reference to poetic licence, was guess what, a more poetic way to put this point!

Is a man allowed to explore these issues from his own perspective? I would say I happen to be one of the males that have these tendencies and have had society outside of my parental home attempting to bang them out of me from a very young age, with constant comments from so called liberal educated (and occasionally feminist) individuals who questioned my sexuality as a result.

Are you perhaps applying out-dated interpretations to words that have a meaning that could be broader?

I return to the fact that this is supposed to create debate not convince you of my opinion, From that perspective alone it has been successful.

That, is the edited version of my response! :o)

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Isobel

Tue 4th Jan 2011 17:05

I'm gonna stick my oar in here - just for a minute. It will probably take Mark a while coming back to answer all those points.

I'd just like to say that I don't see what is wrong with posting a poem that has generalisation in it. If every poem had to be about bang on certainties, we would all be pretty restricted. At the end of the day, we are all coming at poetry from different experiences and backgrounds and that will colour our opinions.

Regarding women making better nurturers - I would have to agree with that generalisation. Like it or not there is a pronounced difference between males and females from birth. I have observed children play - from being very tiny they choose different toys, play differently and it isn't a question of conditioning - it is a question of choice.

Granted there will always be the exceptions to the rule like you and me Laura (my favourite toy was a cannon that smashed all my mum's pictures to bits) but on the whole the genders tend to follow a behaviour pattern from childhood - it is instinctive.

I would agree that men have great qualities also - let me scratch my head while I think of one ;-)

I would agree that extreme feminism harmed the cause if anything but can also see the point that it threw the issue into the public eye - much like the suffragettes.

I would agree with your point 7 Laura - though I think Mark is connecting loss of listening skills with the loutish, belligerent behaviour of a certain type of youth.

Tee hee - I did warn you Mark...

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Laura Taylor

Tue 4th Jan 2011 13:18

Hi Mark

Firstly, you mention below that you would actively encourage ideological critique, but then go on to say 'This is after all a poem not a theoretical lecture, so the term poetic licence may apply' - am a bit confused as to what you want from the feedback, but as you have requested, here's a bit more...you did ask!

Re Rad Feminism - as I've already stated, I believe it to be an important step in the process, but I don't think it should continue as a current way of thinking. As with Malcolm X/Nation of Islam, it is a separatist movement - is that the way to reach equality? Malcolm X reached the conclusion that it wasn't. The Rad Fems took an aggressive inversely sexist position, which merely replicated a hierarchy. Doesn't solve anything ultimately, just pits people against each other.

The first verse, lines 3 and 4 - I don't understand. The culture is what is instinct? Which important female qualities? The nurturing?

Transgender pat on the back? I don't understand why t/g comes into it.

Generalisations:

1. Women make the best nurturers

2. Further to my confusion outlined above, I will take the understanding of 'important female qualities' being female. Why female? That's a huge disservice you do to men there, not to mention setting boundaries for women.

3. Derided almost everywhere - are they? Is it? Do you mean in the media, or in the massively diverse society we have?

4. Ladettes? Outdated terminology, as is the phrase 'equal but different'. The latter is Victorian in origin, in terms of feminist discourse, and it both sets and limits all genders, by fencing in 'masculine' and 'feminine' qualities, and instructs people as to how they should be.

5. 'feminine quality'? As above. How so? Who says? Equanimity's definition is in opposition to the psychological and media-favoured representations of women as irrational beings.

6. Again with sex and gender - if we're talking aggression, how about the Rad Fems Scum Manifesto, and Dworkin's theory that all men are potential rapists, that heterosexual penetrative sex is rape?

7. Why does powerful projection equal a lack of listening skills? What is this based on?

Sorry for the epic, but like I said, you did ask!

Again, disclaimer that this is not being negative for negativity's sake, just explaining as requested.


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Mark Mr T Thompson

Tue 4th Jan 2011 10:45

Hi Laura, thanks for reading this.

Yes my mother IS a radical feminist, her definition not yours so I guess she can own that. Without the radicals in any area there is no middle ground, no acceptance of Dr King without Malcolm, so while I agree media mis-representations warp opinion, the radical is in my opinion vital. If it wasn't for people like my mother, you yourself would be considered by others as a radical, even if you didn't consider yourself one!

Which are the generalisations that you feel are outdated or excessive? Can you explain why?

Hard to respond to such generalised comment, you guys haven't even got the excuse of attempting to be lyrical! ;)

This is after all a poem not a theoretical lecture, so the term poetic licence may apply.

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Laura Taylor

Tue 4th Jan 2011 10:11

This leaves me bemused. As mentioned, it is one almighty set of generalisations, many of which I disagree with, and many of which are outdated.

Your mother is a RADICAL feminist? Even now? Whilst it was a hugely important movement, and had some excellent points, feminism moved on a heck of a lot since it was first proposed as a theory. I find it way too separatist and damaging, ultimately. It's my belief, based on experience, that too many young women these days reject feminism/ists on account of radical feminism, as that is the only form of feminism ever represented by our lovely media.

There's some interesting points in here, but to me, it's just way too outdated and generalising to be making any kind of a statement.

I am a feminist by the way, but don't adhere to any one theory - my beliefs are taken from those parts of Socialist, Existentialist, and Postmodern feminism that I identify with. Certainly not anything that is separatist and limiting.

Apologies if this comes across as negative btw, but you did welcome debate.


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Banksy

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 23:13

I happen to like seeing girls fighting & pissing in the streets - especially the latter ;)
And I see Isobel's jumped up on her soapbox..... again!!
Seriously - great points, well made and ones that we could talk through forever.
And Isobel's a sweetie.
True equality & mutual respect can only be a good thing & I'm all for it. As for sacrificing a career (many careers) to have kids - well, that's a choice & a biological fact - that women are the ones with a womb (the clue's in the name). No-one ever said life was fair. We men have our crosses to bear as well (putting up with wimmin for a start :D )

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 20:48

My mother tried (and she would say failed) to sum it up in a 10,000 word (well that was the target length, she handed it in incomplete at around twice that length) dissertation, so I think to suggest it could have been done in one poem, much less 25 words, without recourse to generalisation is a bit like hoping the answer to life the universe and everything is 42!
Even if it was the 'right answer' you would not have space or time to adequately context it with the question.

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Isobel

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 20:36

I suppose equality of the sexes/ agreement on traits of the sexes/ behavioural issues/ how we nurture/ how we respect the nurturers - is all a huge subject matter for one poem. I did go off on a bit of a tangent with my earlier comments - homing in on aspects of inequality that have got to me. I suppose they weren't the issues that are core to your poem.
I enjoyed the poem cos it made me think about something that has touched my life big style. I've even started writing a poem about it! It is a piece of catharsis though - so I'm umming and aaghing about whether to finish and post.

I thought your summary was fair. I like to see poetry on here handling serious issues also.

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 20:03

Hi Julian, thanks for taking the time to read and respond. My aim is not really to seek agreement with this piece, rather to prompt debate, which it seems to be doing quite well.

Having stated in the opening sentence that I am a feminist I am not sure how I could be more clear about beliefs. I feel that what could be descibed as feminine personality traits (a useful generalisation I feel) tend to be considered of less value.

The bluffers guide would read, "We spotted gender inequality and mistakenly thought that everyone being more masculine was an improvement. Perhaps there was/is/maybe a better way! Please discuss"

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Julian (Admin)

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 19:44

Mark, I commend your desire to say something important on this subject. Good for you for your intentions. That being said, I feel that what you achieve does little justice to the topic. As Isobel says, "some generalisations in here"; too many, Mark.
Your piece does not make clear what you stand for or believe in, thus it is impossible to disagree with you. What is the central statement of your piece? What do you intend it to say? If your poem were to be represented on the bluffer's guide, what would be your summary in 25 words or fewer?

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Isobel

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 19:21

Speaking from my own experience, I found that giving up my career to become a full time mum, had a dramatic impact on the whole dynamics of my marriage. Gradually I became a non person - like my opinion didn't count cos I no longer earned money. It was probably overnight really - but I it took me a while to realise it LOL Obviously everyone has different experiences and they will be affected by personal circumstances/individual characteristics.

Within all of this is the importance of nurture, which is something close to my heart. Let's give child rearing it's due importance. Be it the man or the woman who makes sacrifices, sacrifices need to be made. I'm not a big fan of the 'stick your kid into care' from 7am till 6pm kind of regime. The sad thing about our society is that house prices push many into having no choice. Food for thought indeed.

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Mark Mr T Thompson

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 18:28

A bit of controversy won't kill me!

My mother is a radical feminist (BSC in sociology specialising in women's studies) who agrees pretty whole heartedly. So far the only negative feedback has been from people who didn't fully understand it. I would actively encourage ideological critique.

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Isobel

Mon 3rd Jan 2011 17:41

There are of course some generalisations in here but on the whole I LOVE it. Too often equality is sought in what I would consider the aping of less attractive male characteristics.

In chasing dreams of equity
We came to be more equal but crucially
We became indifferent to the importance of difference.

I like these lines - along with much of the thought in here. I have long said that true equality lies in giving woman due respect and credit for what she chooses to do - be that the big career or the rearing of children. Given that respect woman will find greater satisfaction in what they do and less internal conflict.

Great poem - great piece of thought - though be prepared for many to disagree with you. x

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