Jumping into a Waterfall: Anna Percy, Flapjack

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Manchester-based Anna Percy is a firework of a poet. But I am left pondering what sort of firework – not a rocket, not a Roman candle, more a Catherine wheel, swirly, sparky and deceptively dangerous.

This collection is as provocative as ever but somehow warmer than usual, influenced by her travels around the country:

 

     We drank till dawn 

 

     And now the houses are too peopley

     We went to hear the sea to heal our psyches

     So hungover that if we sat down in the house

     We would miss the day

            (‘Why Are Two People Just Lying On The Beach?’)

 

I love the word ‘peopley’ – just perfect.

The stream of consciousness piece called ‘Fall’ is a brilliant description of cycling in Manchester complete with cat-calling oafs and tumbles on tram tracks – terrific.

 

     he staggers centred down the roads

     I have concern for his wayward movements

     Waver between worry he might fall

     Or that he will start to pay me more attention

     the gender chasm yawns between us after half-one in the morning

     His nonchalant walk home my anxious trot and stop

     Behind this guy I might have got on with

     If introduced at a house party

     The way a sloppy drunk man can turn on you

     Transform from stumbling fawn to rearing stag

                                                    (‘Post Night Bus’)

 

The opening poem ‘Advice for Arran’ is a delight starting, “‘The shops need to be informed we are visiting and stock more / Arran Gold ice cream and the 14-year-old whisky.”

This collection is sometimes disturbing and exposing and at other times funny and warm – not always a comfortable read but highly recommended, especially if you are not familiar with Percy’s work. Plus lovely illustrations by Sarah Peploe.

 

Anna Percy, Jumping into a Waterfall, Flapjack Press, £6

 

◄ Inauguration poet Amanda Gorman 'followed home and accosted by security guard'

A poem to mark International Women's Day by Rachel McGladdery ►

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