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stephen smith

Updated: Sun, 13 Sep 2009 01:56 pm

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Biography

I am a recent immigrant from Ireland who has been writing for a long time, though as a subordinate activity to my activism. I have had agitprop plays performed during my time in Ireland and a documentary broadcast on RTE in 1998. I have had some poems published in now defunct) political journals. I currently read (perform) at the Dead Good Poets in Liverpool. I seek to have recent satirical sketches performed -the themes are from the current political degeneration of Britain and Western Europe and the culture of self-supervision. I also have a number of short stories touting for publication and a novel in progress. I have just finished a play called 'Comfort', which I am touting to festivals and theatre companies.Set in an psycho-therapy call centre.

Samples

Death of a leader When I heard of your death, I thought of tartan, Your skirt’s red plaid, rebellion’s stale disguise, Tasted bitter coffee ,that welcome spartan, For us, whose virgin ardour hailed you wise. In a basement room you sat before our fire , Heard us conjure an end to this world of lies, Call criminal the loves which could not aspire To build your clockwork logic’s paradise. Our youth neither poverty nor danger feared, In factory and street greed’s bane we fought, Then far utopias fell and your decrees appeared, Sordid ,without the robes our faith had bought.. You twisted love into hooks , truth into lures , To capture souls more generous than yours. Legacy Behind ivy- draped garden walls, ‘For-sale’ signs ,pretty colored lollipop heads Of Royal blue,,signal red, zinc white ,apple green On fresh-wood yellow sticks, Spring up, in this the autumn of our greed. Brightly in sign language they bespeak The autism of your need , heralding the hour To vacate the penthouse flat, hawk the terraced Two-up, two-down, once the migrant navvy’s crown,. You who scorned to name a humble house a home , A place where the heart is, to lay the weary head , But chortled to the banker and the old schoolfriend ‘Finger my portfolio of undeveloped property, Not dwellings these, but tradeable blocks of equity, Counters, chips ,items in a gambler’s game. Treasure pots for the daring , cages for the tame.’ So You climbed the property ladder, The rungs you stole, you wrecked the frame All came apart, and you’ve landed on your hole. What price your outdoor hot-tub now? The shares of time you sold on-line To fund that villa in the South of France ?? You have to leave the roof , but take the floor! It’s time to do the Benefits Shuffle, Learn the family- credit dance. Know your place, stand in line, practise the Disability whine, chant and pant to invoke the ghost of Margaret Thatcher, that kiddies’ milk- snatcher, Transatlantic carrier of the virus of greed, Oh what a carry-on! You caught her bird ‘flu , You thought it gave you wings to fly to a higher social station, now you beg the socialist splint to heal your painful dislocation, dislocation, dislocation. Remember how you beckoned skeksis Thatcher, Corporate Thatcher, the vulture - hatcher , Into the nest? Cuckoo- style she had you incubate the scavenger’s egg ,and when . the birds flew, beyond your ladder’s reach they soared , In spotting carrion , unerring they have grown! Those vultures are coming home to roost, Move out, clear off! the nest was just on loan! And if you need more balm to salve your hurt. Repeat this mantra when they re-possess; Less is more, loss is mere, You’re not without a home, Merely property -less..

All poems are copyright of the originating author. Permission must be obtained before using or performing others' poems.

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Comments

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Harry O'Neill

Sun 5th Feb 2017 17:04

Steve,
If you remember, talking after seeing your
play in Liverpool I found it difficult to describe a
play of my own, and said I might blog it on here.

I wrote it after wondering if it was possible to do
a mainly `static` kind of fantastic play which made
the audience have to pay more heed to dialogue.

I`ve blogged the first (short) scene and wonder if
you`ve had a look at it yet.

It`s intended to `set up` the dramatic elements of
situation, protaginsts, antagonist, and goal to be
achieved against which the actual aim of the play
(which was satire) can take place.

The subject of the play is `iffy` and - as I thought -
there has been no reaction, but I would welcome
your opinion as to whether you think this scene
`works` (purely as a `set up` to keep the actors
arguing and the audience wondering)

It`s William and Benjamin (blogged 1st Jan)

(If you are busy on other things now, dont worry
I quite understand)

Lan

Sun 31st May 2015 13:07

Hi Steve, thanks so much for commenting on Song for Imar, I really appreciate it x

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Ian Whiteley

Thu 1st Jan 2015 21:24

thanks for the kind comments on 'a wee dram' Steve. I raise my glass to you *clink* cheers

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Harry O'Neill

Thu 20th Nov 2014 21:49

Steve,
Hope you were flying higher than that plane tonight!

That play was quite an accomplishment.

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David Cooke

Thu 20th Nov 2014 12:48

Hi Stephen Thanks for comment on poem and glad you liked it!

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Harry O'Neill

Wed 19th Nov 2014 19:43

Steve,
We enjoyed your play very much last night. I was amazed at how much that part of Liverpool has changed....I hope you`re allowed to put it on back in Ireland.

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Harry O'Neill

Mon 17th Nov 2014 20:14

Steve

Looking forward to seeing your play tomorrow night.

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Laura Taylor

Sat 27th Sep 2014 10:27

Thanks Steve

I couldn't think of a title, too upset.

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Isobel

Tue 15th Oct 2013 19:06

Yes - I realised the 'contentment' word was wrong as soon as I'd posted it. I don't think many poets are contented - we all think too much for that.

The closest we can get to contentment is perhaps the lack of abject misery :) I've been there a couple of times in my life - enough to value this lack of contentment phase perhaps :)

Intrepid - moi? I like the idea...

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Laura Taylor

Tue 15th Oct 2013 12:39

Ha!! Copyrighting :D They'd be proper chuffed about that eh?! ;D

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Laura Taylor

Mon 14th Oct 2013 17:00

Eh up! It's here :)

Forgotten I'd written it last year!

http://www.writeoutloud.net/public/blogentry.php?blogentryid=32043

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Laura Taylor

Mon 14th Oct 2013 11:17

Hey - thanks very much for your note on 'Assembly' :) Chuffed to bits that it's been published on Poetry24 today too :) :)

Hope to see you soon!

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Michel Francois

Tue 13th Aug 2013 19:21

Voilà - un autre Français !
sounds good - well done for a full house

When I introduce my audio in a few weeks
you will hear a little more of this Frenchman

all the best
Michel François

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Michel Francois

Mon 12th Aug 2013 11:16

Bonjour Stephen
I have seen your work 'Death of a Leader'
- enlightening with passion and well-crafted
How did you get on with 'Comfort'
my best, Michel François.

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 5th Apr 2013 21:20


Steve,
My apologies for not recognising and speaking to you at the last`spoke`.

It was a combination of ancientness, confusion through missing the road earlier, and not seeing much of you lately at the blog (plus myself not having very much idea what one of the bloody poems I was reading was about)

I hope you are well.

darren thomas

Thu 29th Nov 2012 16:31

Thanks for your recent comments Stevie. You're not a zillion miles away.

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Rachel Bond

Fri 28th Oct 2011 16:18

thanks for your comments on 'kiss me...'. will look up m. piercy :)

Steve Smith

Wed 1st Jun 2011 14:54

Profile up-date:
I put 'Comfort' on at the Unity and it was a great success - due to great actors and support from other poets.Since put on a one-hour play called' Trip to the Cottage'(4 venues) and wrote a version of the Tempest set in a Garden Estate -'The Garden of Doctor Prosperous' in blank verse.Hope to stage it in August. Doing readings still and like to keep up with 'Writeoutloud'

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Ann Foxglove

Mon 31st May 2010 16:39

Just logged in to thank you for your lovely comment on Grains. I was thinking that the last bit needed a bit of work! I loved your white cat hunting poem by the way! And enjoyed Death of a Leader. "You twisted love into hooks , truth into lures ,
To capture souls more generous than yours." is a great line. Look forward to more poems from you!

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Tommy Carroll

Sun 20th Dec 2009 15:03

Thank you Stephen.

Janet Ramsden

Wed 16th Dec 2009 21:48

Hi Stephen,
found you at last. Been on and off this site for about 19 months and only just realized there's a facility to search poets. Dumb aren't i !

Thanks for your further comment on Quercus Robur and your suggestion which i'll consider.

Been reading your entries here. Death of a leader i found to be quite 'shocking'.
You are a very eloquent writer.
Love the imagery and scents in the last blog post. It reminds me of an advert on tv. A black cloaked mysterious lady like a Turkish Delight.
I could sense the need and wanting to believe your eyes and the urge to seek her again.
Super.

Starlight.x

Deborah Jordan

Tue 8th Dec 2009 19:17

Hi Steve, thanks for your comment on Of The Earth. Musical ? kind of but, no it isn't meant as a requiem, different belief system and more about diminishing than death, i intended anyway. Thank you for commenting, deb : )

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Augusta Darling

Thu 26th Nov 2009 14:52

Good afternoon,
Thank you so much for reading my poem and your generous comments. .

The question of honesty is a doubt throughout the poem, is the girl being honest with herself, her emotions are saying one thing her fear another and foremost her lust and sexual arousal quite another. The honesty of the writer is paramount and of course I am being honest many girls are placed or place them selves in this situation, between a rock and a hard place.

The writer in this instance was the young girl within the poem.

Once again many thanks for your honesty and comment..

Augusta x

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Dave Carr

Fri 20th Nov 2009 23:51

Stephen, I read your poems because you commented on one of mine. Thanks for that. I have to say that Death of a leader is very well done - seamless in fact - a seamless sonnet. Cheers.

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Tommy Carroll

Wed 18th Nov 2009 01:07

Steve TYFYC and I will be extending the franchise!

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Nichola Burrows

Wed 28th Oct 2009 14:38

Hey, Steve, thanks for the great comment on 'Siren', really appreciated. Had a bit of a panic when I blogged it and toned it down a little, save the rest for a colourful performance. lol x

Getting a bit of a regular here on your profile. thanks again, nicky.x

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Nichola Burrows

Mon 26th Oct 2009 12:05

Are you still working with them Steve? I'm organising an event between BRASS and WOL, just pinning the date down today but going to be the first week of December.

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Nichola Burrows

Sun 25th Oct 2009 11:02

Hi Steve, thanks for the comment on open-mic virgin. Read at the Howcroft last Sunday, great experience, hopefully go again next time or may try the Tudor next, reasonably local to me in Bolton.

Wanted to put a comment up about 'The Taleban are Skitting Me Nan', but considering I work with asylum seekers and refugees, thought it may be a little politically incorrect of me. Thought it was a very clever and humourous poem though. I enjoyed it.

Nicky x

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Andy Williamson

Fri 23rd Oct 2009 21:42

Hi Stephen
Thanks so much for your comment on "A Day in the Life". I have spend plenty of time on the road over the last few years, and somehow this all came together the other night.
A very descriptive summation

Take care

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garside

Fri 16th Oct 2009 19:51

Hi Steve

t'was a simple twist of fate ;-)

thanks for taking the time to read and make comment on my work

steve x

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