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More of What?

What kinds of poetry would you as readers like to see more of?

Love ballads?

Stories and epics?

Free verse?

Limericks?

I'm curious as to what modern readers such as yourselves prefer for poetry at the moment. Haiku?
Sat, 1 Dec 2018 12:31 am
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Graham Sherwood

Whilst Haiku is (and has been) very popular on WOL, there are many more different, of shall we say, oriental forms to choose from.

Haiku does impose a strict use of words with its Westernized 5-7-5 scheme. However Pantun, Haibun, Koan offer far more opportunities for expression.

I have some examples on my blog (see reference on my profile page).

I have just begun trying to write limericks without humour. It's harder than you think!
14 days ago
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Hmm. Something to think on definitely.

I guess it's the same boat as writing modern poetry that rhymes (since most poetry nowadays doesn't).

People will always find a way to put new twists on old art forms, and that is inspiring in itself. It's like a kaleidoscope in looking at things.
14 days ago
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I find writing to a set form an interesting and refreshing challenge that pushes my poetry technique. I need to get better educated on the options out there though.

Personally I have to say I find free verse the trickiest of all. If it is done well it works, but it seems to me to be often mistaken for a way to splurge ideas without refining them afterwards.
12 days ago
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Yes that is how I learned to write poetry was practicing with free verse. In school we always had to do structured poems in English class, and it was always too easy. Anyone can write a structure poem by substituting words until one eventually fits the bill.

Writing in free verse is difficult to convey intention with each line without it sounding abstract or too surreal in aspects. Villanelles I know are extremely stimulating to write, as well as a renku.

Tons of forms out there that have yet to be perfected, Becky you could throw a stone and choose one where it lands. My favorite to read and write by far are free verse, but I also enjoy a good alternating sonnet, ballads, most well-constructed lyrics, etc.
11 days ago
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Prose poetry.

I'm currently writing iso-verbalist poetry - poetry using number of words not sylables. Makes for an interesting variation in line.
10 days ago
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That is a different twist on what I've usually heard from readers of prose poetry. Most don't pick out their favorite aspects, and simply leave it to chance.

It's always good to see a charted list of what people enjoy, because that can make it easier for a writer to tap into the zeitgeist or societal fervor present in any era. Back when Tolkien was writing books, I can only assume fantastical works about outer space and under the sea were the outer limits of people's imaginations.

Now we have 4th dimensions, unexplained flying objects, climate change, and a host of other problems unique to our era. I guess it will be interesting to see the twist the following generations put on their art forms - especially their poetry. Like I said, poetry is always changing with the times, but a successful formula that works will always work regardless of the year it is attempted. Doesn't matter if it was 1207 or if it's 2025.

Each line does matter when writing poems though. Some people forget that.
9 days ago
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I find that almost all of my poetry comes into my mind without any forethought. Often I do not know what the poem will be about or any thought of the ending at all.

As I write it, it is as much new to me as the reader.

I hardly ever rewrite a word, The poems you see on my blog are my first draft. and mostly my last.

I have not read that much poetry in my life.

I enjoy William Blake and Emily Dickinson, as for other poets I have yet to read about any enough to comment.

The various types of poetry in all its wonderful diversity is an enigma to me still.

I love reading the many topics and styles here at WOL
welcome all comers!

The support for a novice like myself from so many well meaning and friendly folk here is a testament to human love and understanding

Po
6 days ago
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I never read poetry (outside of school curriculum) until I started to write it.

Practice makes perfect, Po. I enjoy villanelles as well as alternating sonnets.

Sometimes it's fun just to practice a style and see what comes out. A poet is never a writer until they challenge themselves to be one.

I've had to step out of several preconceptions in order to successfully write at the level I do. Originally I put a lot of stock into structure, but now I'm more about the substance.😎
5 days ago
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The poetry that I like is the verse that I feel is like a blow to the heart - Jon Silkin's "Death of a Son" , the first line of Sylvia Plath's "The Munich Mannequins", lots of Wilfrid Owen, etc etc.... There's a quote from Kafka "... books that make us happy we could write ourselves ..."
So I try to write a good line and seldom succeed. One day....
2 days ago
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That search for perfection has also led me to question my own methods and instead look for the madness to cope. It's tough constantly striving to best oneself and outdo what we've done in the past. It's possible, takes practice, and so worth it, but it is difficult.

I often find that most writers that don't think they themselves are up to par with the rest are actually above the rest in terms of skill and output. Your poetry has already found its feet Alan, now it'll find its wings of inspiration on WOL. So many wells to draw from it's hard to decide which bucket to bring.

But striving for that one day will provide the impetus for great things, mark my words on that. It's good seeing all great writers flourish or test their own limits.💪😁
2 days ago
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Thanks Big Sal. I'll keep trying.
2 days ago
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