The creative process

Whilst thinking about the haphazardness (is that a word?) of my own creative process, I was wondering whether people generally find solitude or immersion better conduits for their own creativity.

I seem to flit between the two, but often feel detached even when seemingly engaged with others. Is this the impact of being an observer of things, and is it necessary to see things askew to come at them from unusual perspectives.

Sorry, I've got some time to kill and was just wondering.

David.

Sat, 10 Mar 2018 09:56 am
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Hi David,

My most enjoyable writing period was in 2016 when I was travelling in the States. Although I met lots of interesting people I also spent a huge amount of time in my own company in remote corners immersing myself in the landscape, history, nature and culture of the open road. If I had done that same trip with a companion it wouldn't have been the same experience although that seems a rather obvious statement having written it! But often the time of day I enjoyed the most was when I was relaxing in a motel or tent and reflecting on the day that had been. And writing about it without interruptions.

About being a detached observer. I think many of us feel that way. A good journalist can come across as being poetic both in print and in front of the camera. How can we forget Michael Buerk's 1984 Ethiopian famine report which started "Dawn, and as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on the plains outside Korem, it lights up a biblical famine, now, in the 20th century." I've just watched the first couple of minutes on YouTube and the whole piece is not a million miles from poetry. I'm sure the poet shares some of that same journalistic detachment both out and about and whilst engaging directly with people. I suspect it's in our personalities to start with, which is partly why we write poetry.

All the best. Colin.
Sat, 10 Mar 2018 08:41 pm
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