The Sword of ‘Damocles’

The Sword of ‘Damocles’

 

This is the fable of an ancient king

Who decides for a day his friend he would bring

To swop places in his palace and experience his life

All of his joys…   and all of his strife!

 

His friend only seeing mass opulence

The Kings life full of joy, and magnificence 

So dressed in fine robes a banquet was set

The friend sat for his meal unaware of the threat

 

Surrounded by servants fine food and wine

A feast fit for a king he started to dine

His friend, the real king, sat a distance away

At the other end of the table, started to say

 

“Let’s all raise a toast to my very best friend”

Who lifting his goblet, high it ascends

Followed by his eyes, he spied over his head

A sight so fearful, it filled him with dread

 

As there over his head hung the blade of a sword

Suspended by a horse hair, just one single cord

Dangling preciously, it menacing swayed

Frozen to the spot, the friend fearfully stayed

 


The moral of this story, fable of old

As countless times it has been told

In 'The sword of ‘Damocles’ the anecdote is clear

Always be aware of dangers so near

 

As Dionysius the King eloquently portrayed

With the use of a sword, and a single braid

 

Does not Dionysius seem to have made it sufficiently clear that there can be nothing happy for the person over whom some fear always looms?

Po

Damoclesfablefear

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Comments

poemagraphic

Wed 6th Feb 2019 15:16

Alan The loonies really have taken over old pal.

What strange times we live in.

Like you, I will glad when I've had enough.

WE had the best of times.

Best music, best TV. No mobiles, no wifi, no chemtrails, no GM

Ho Hum!
Said Po

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Alan Travis Braddock

Wed 6th Feb 2019 11:31

Yes. JFK was right in that speech. Unfortunately we have now in the USA an idiot, in Russia someone who will not be faced down, in China and North Korea unknown quantities and - after Brexit - ourselves in the middle.
I'm 87 years old; Probably I'll be out of here sometime in the next 10 years. I hope before these half-brained fools start another war.. I feel very unhappy for my descendants, and you, whoever you are..

poemagraphic

Tue 5th Feb 2019 18:38

The tale of Dionysius and Damocles represented the idea that those in power always labor under the specter of anxiety and death, and that “there can be no happiness for one who is under constant apprehensions.”

The parable later became a common motif in medieval literature, and the phrase “sword of Damocles” is now commonly used as a catchall term to describe a looming danger. Likewise, the saying “hanging by a thread” has become shorthand for a fraught or precarious situation.

One of its more famous uses came in 1961 during the Cold War, when President John F. Kennedy gave a speech before the United Nations in which he said that “Every man, woman and child lives under a nuclear sword of Damocles, hanging by the slenderest of threads, capable of being cut at any moment by accident or miscalculation or by madness.”

Somethings never change it seems

Po

<Deleted User> (16837)

Tue 5th Feb 2019 18:29

Age has nothing to do with death.

Enemy also has nothing to do with death.

A person can die unaware anyway.

Death is the only reality and yes the ultimate reality. It's a fearful friend/foe that looms upon everyone. Reasons could be any.....from a fatal heart attack to deadly disease or an accident. But should this cause unhappiness?

We have to live irrespective of our situations. Which sure Allah has placed for us. It is only a test by Allah. He gives problems and he solves them too. Leave everything on him and live in peace.

There isn't perfect sadness or happiness for anyone. Eachone has their own fears and troubles. But we need to rely on God more than on our wisdom alone.

A treacherous friend can kill a papuer too. But papuer has nothing to lose, so he isn't afraid of anything.

I liked your poem.....just answered the question from my perspective.🙌

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