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Rose Casserley

Sat 25th Jan 2014 17:09

LOL!bigtime.x

Comment is about Don't take your Elephant to School (blog)

Original item by Gray Nicholls

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Rose Casserley

Sat 25th Jan 2014 17:07

Hi Otis.A lot of work has gone into this wonderful poem,with excellent results.x

Comment is about Forgetting Home (or how can I forget you if you won't go away) (blog)

Original item by J. Otis Powell‽ (with interrobang)

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Rose Casserley

Sat 25th Jan 2014 17:01

this is a superb poem guys,even if it did quiver my bottom lip.x

Comment is about sad interruption (blog)

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M.C. Newberry

Sat 25th Jan 2014 16:59

Well done, JC! Their cunning ploy was thwarted.
I recall visiting Leningrad (as was) in the late
70s. Flying in by Aeroflot to an airport which
had barely any lighting and an empty arrivals
hall manned by surly young men in coarse uniforms - immediately reminding us where we
were. I was amazed that my copy of "Country Life" (taken for in-flight reading) wasn't found and seized!!
It was, however, an eye-opener is so many ways,
remembering that this was the St Petersburg of
Tsarist Russia - with all its history including its famous hold-out against German forces in WW2.
On departing, I left my "Country Life" in my room to give the Babushka who minded my hotel
floor an insight into the capitalist way of
life. I still wonder about its fate!

Comment is about The Time I Saved Western Democracy from Communism (blog)

Original item by John Coopey

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M.C. Newberry

Sat 25th Jan 2014 16:47

Thanks Harry.
But I must admit...there is something very
satisfying about alliteration: perhaps to do with the form of rhythm it employs.

Comment is about FALLEN ANGEL - a song (blog)

Original item by M.C. Newberry

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Rose Casserley

Sat 25th Jan 2014 16:40

tis indeed mateys.Have yer got a light boy?

haha-x

Comment is about From a bar stool (blog)

Todd Swift

Sat 25th Jan 2014 12:55

Firstly, let me thank you David for your kind support. Secondly, in response to M.C. Newberry, the reason for the funds being withdrawn are sad - the patron lost their additional funds on the stockmarket last year. Eyewear's business model was and is sound, and this is why new investors are coming to us with interest. Regarding age-restriction, Eyewear publishes poets of all ages, including Elspeth Smith, in her 80s.

Comment is about Publisher comes out fighting after losing funding (article)

Original item by Greg Freeman

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John Coopey

Sat 25th Jan 2014 12:28

Happy to collect from you any time, Starfish!
(I assume OBE = Other Buggers' Efforts?)

Comment is about The Time I Saved Western Democracy from Communism (blog)

Original item by John Coopey

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Laura Taylor

Sat 25th Jan 2014 11:42

I reckon naming Gove actually places it even stronger, historically. It marks a time, and ascribes the ideology and the propagandist lexicon to a member of this particular government – the worst one I can remember, in terms of the brutal damage they’ve wreaked.

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Starfish

Sat 25th Jan 2014 09:00

Thank you, Mr. Coopey. We owe you so much, I think you deserve an OBE.

Comment is about The Time I Saved Western Democracy from Communism (blog)

Original item by John Coopey

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Starfish

Sat 25th Jan 2014 08:42

Also, it now seems we are recovering from the recession which was claimed to have been caused by the incompetency of the previous government. Another fact I read recently was that this government has borrowed more in one term than Labour did in its three whole terms in office.

Comment is about Democracy is dead (blog)

Original item by Lynn Dye

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Starfish

Sat 25th Jan 2014 08:36

Indeed the unemployed and the disabled are being demonised and branded scroungers to justify cuts to benefits causing untold distress and even suicides. However, when you look at welfare spending only a small percentage is actually spent on unemployment and disability benefits, the majority is spent on pensions and tax credits to top up low and part-time wages to give people a liveable wage. The Government know it would be political suicide to demonise pensioners as they are more likely to vote, so they attack the people in society who are most vulnerable.

Comment is about Democracy is dead (blog)

Original item by Lynn Dye

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alan barlow

Sat 25th Jan 2014 08:34

thanks starfish appreciate the time taken to comment and im glad you liked it, i look forward to reading you again soon.

Comment is about Starfish (poet profile)

Original item by Starfish

Kenneth Eaton-Dykes

Sat 25th Jan 2014 01:34

Thanks Harry

It's hard keeping healthy doing retirement. (Never get a day off)

Comment is about Harry O`N eill (poet profile)

Original item by Harry O`N eill

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 22:11


Jan,
Thanks for your comment on the play.

Comment is about jan oskar hansen (poet profile)

Original item by jan oskar hansen

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 22:09


Lynn,
Thanks for your comment on the play

(I thought I`d blogged this, I don`t know where it went :))

Comment is about Lynn Dye (poet profile)

Original item by Lynn Dye

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jan oskar hansen

Fri 24th Jan 2014 21:44

very enjoyable

Comment is about While waiting for inspiration (blog)

Original item by Harry O`N eill

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 21:38


REGARDING WORK,

Is anyone else as surprised (astounded) AS i AM
at the sudden support for a higher minimum wage and all the strange interest in - not the difference between rich and poor - but the growing discrepency between the pay of people in the jobs that exist. It sems to be becoming a problem.

Comment is about Democracy is dead (blog)

Original item by Lynn Dye

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John Coopey

Fri 24th Jan 2014 21:33

Harry - We in British Coal were pretty much the doziest bunch you would ever meet on a long day's march.

Comment is about The Time I Saved Western Democracy from Communism (blog)

Original item by John Coopey

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 21:26


Agree with all said.

My mate always used to say:

`When your poem`s not doing well
Alliterate like bloody hell`

Comment is about FALLEN ANGEL - a song (blog)

Original item by M.C. Newberry

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 21:02


Those last two lines would send a shiver down anyones spine.

HiS deliberate walk on the mount revealed an
unmistakeable reality about the actual delicate situation in that powder-keg of a place.

(And I don`t mean just a powder-keg for the Middle East)

Comment is about the last soldier (blog)

Original item by jan oskar hansen

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 20:36


David,
A belated thanks for your comment on the play

I was trying to get rid of the `explanational` stuff and get down to the bare bones of the thing and give the actors something to play with...It`s much harder when trying to bring in sub plots.

Comment is about David Blake (poet profile)

Original item by David Blake

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 20:26



A clearly put universally applicable.

Comment is about All My Own Work (blog)

Original item by Rob J Mann

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Harry O'Neill

Fri 24th Jan 2014 20:16


John,
You dozy swine! WE COULD HAVE FOUND OUT THEIR WHOLE CHEMICAL SYSTEM!

(Shortly after the war we got a german management trainee at my Tobacco factory who had been a Luftwaffe bomb aimer over Liverpool
He told us that -on bright moonlight nights - they used to locate the river, the canal, and the railway lines reflecting as ribbons and aim accordingly)

The point is that the factory was located plumb between the canal and the railway lines.

Ya!...we told him...Missed !!!


Comment is about The Time I Saved Western Democracy from Communism (blog)

Original item by John Coopey

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John Coopey

Fri 24th Jan 2014 19:46

Thank God they do keep coming back for more. It's when they don't we've a problem. And of course, Ian, it's we the performers who can't but help go back for more!

Comment is about Cheap Whore (blog)

Original item by Ian Whiteley

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Laura Taylor

Fri 24th Jan 2014 15:54

Ha - well, I like the poem, and wouldn't it be fab to actually get paid? I have done, on the odd occasion - felt great! Aiming to get more of that haha.

I never feel hurt though afterwards - I must really enjoy it ;)

Comment is about Cheap Whore (blog)

Original item by Ian Whiteley

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Robert Mann

Fri 24th Jan 2014 15:53

Thanks for the positive feedback - not been there myself, but have seen plenty of examples!

Comment is about Self Medication (blog)

Original item by Rob J Mann

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Laura Taylor

Fri 24th Jan 2014 15:51

Aye, one of my favourite songs of all time that still has the power to tear me in two is Hot Burrito #1. Nice tribute :)

Comment is about Grievous Angel (blog)

Original item by Ian Whiteley

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Laura Taylor

Fri 24th Jan 2014 15:46

I really like this. Been there done that, still doing it but with a more positive feel to it these days ;) Less addict. Love those last two lines - bang on.

Comment is about Self Medication (blog)

Original item by Rob J Mann

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Tommy Carroll

Fri 24th Jan 2014 15:35

Did I not reply sooner? I've sent an email thanking you. Tommy

Comment is about Shevaughn Pimenta (poet profile)

Original item by Shevaughn Pimenta

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SPACEGHOST

Fri 24th Jan 2014 14:31

thanks Dave for your comment the mountains are alive and well with madness , i don't know why i love doing them , when i am there i get confused and can think why am i here in this wind and rain? but always want to return , think i am addicted to the way things feel up there harsh and strange ,my parents are not fans of my hobby
but i like testing myself i think its human nature i could talk of mountains all day
stay well keep on it peace

Comment is about Dave Bradley (poet profile)

Original item by Dave Bradley

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attila the stockbroker

Fri 24th Jan 2014 13:17

Not offended in the slightest :) Looking forward to lots of gigs in the NW soon - that appears to be where everyone else here is from....

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Isobel

Fri 24th Jan 2014 12:46

Sorry if my suggestion offended you Attila. This is a poetry website where we often offer feedback - critical or otherwise to fellow poets.

There is a button for disabling comments - none that asks for positive feedback only though ;)

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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M.C. Newberry

Fri 24th Jan 2014 12:21

Even Siegfried Sassoon generalised (no pun intended) in his own form of protest poetry.
<"Good morning, good morning", the general said...>
SS might have put a name but didn't. The effect
of the poem still resonates - in posterity...
suggesting a wider (and damning) responsibility among those with power over others.
But each to his own form of protest. That much
is understood.
Good luck.

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Patricia and Stefan Wilde

Fri 24th Jan 2014 10:40

ps.one Packard Bell p.c. and its cursed cursor is heading back to P.C.World-ASAP!!

got this comment on afer six attempts-ugh!!

Comment is about Disaster (blog)

Original item by Paul Sands

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Patricia and Stefan Wilde

Fri 24th Jan 2014 10:36

are we right Solar,in assuming this tobacco infiltrated poem is set in pre fag ban times?

US loved it!xx

Comment is about From a bar stool (blog)

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attila the stockbroker

Fri 24th Jan 2014 09:00

I write for now: I don't write for posterity. I've always thought that if you set out to write for posterity you'll end up writing for posteriority, ie talking out of your arse :)
Happy in the here and now, Attila

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Dave Bradley

Fri 24th Jan 2014 08:41

Tellingly well written. The understatement highlights just how horrific it was. When I was about 8 I remember listening to old Mr. Harris from down the road describing (with pleasure) running his machine gun along a row of Germans and seeing them all fall down. I was open-mouthed at the time. But now......even if you win a war like that, what have you done to the survivors on your own side? Left them with a nightmarish mix of traumatic memories and satisfaction at their own successful barbarism. What is happening in Syria right now?

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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alan barlow

Fri 24th Jan 2014 00:40

cuts on a number of levels this you dirty whorebag haha i like it because it makes me think, so many references to this site and potentially to rainy days gone by, keep em coming whorebag ;-)

Comment is about Cheap Whore (blog)

Original item by Ian Whiteley

Kenneth Eaton-Dykes

Fri 24th Jan 2014 00:05

Thanks Starfish
This site needs a bit more humour to offset the prevalence of soul baring

Comment is about Starfish (poet profile)

Original item by Starfish

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attila the stockbroker

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 23:00

Who was the Kaiser? Queen Victoria's grandson. A whole generation were butchered and damned because of one dysfunctional royal family. http://www.channel4.com/programmes/queen-victoria-and-the-crippled-kaiser/episode-guide

It's 'sole survivor soldier' because he was the sole survivor of that battalion. 'Sole surviving soldier' has a different, more general emphasis to me. It's funny to get suggestions for changing my poems - first time ever, after 34 years earning a living at it - good on you :)

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Ian Whiteley

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 22:16

but it is a today poem isn't it? 'And so some lines to spike centenary prattle' puts it in the here and now - the style is of the world war 1 poets - but the voice is of today - I think it is absolutely appropriate that a modern topic is the catalyst for the remembrance. But as you say - us poets.....

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Isobel

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 21:40

Well I could see what MC meant by omitting Gove and using politician instead. The reference to Gove makes it very much a 'today' poem, whereas if you are looking for something that stands the test of time, politician is better. It all depends upon what you are after, I suppose.

Another change I'd make would be

'These words a sole surviving soldier's son's'

Us poets, what are we like? Can't agree on anything and nit pick over a noun or an adjective LOL

I must admit to always having believed the 1st WW was down to German aggression - though I'm no history expert. It will always be remembered for its senseless slaughter of young men though - decisions made and stuck to with no heed to death toll.

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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John F Keane

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 21:15

*A young Adolf Hitler was with the German army and his determination to avenge German defeat was a decisive factor in his own participation in yet another attempt by Germany to seek a dominant role in world affairs.*

Quite unlike Britain of course, which never invaded anywhere... ;-)

http://angloboer.com/crimes.htm

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Starfish

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 20:30

I enjoyed reading this and particularly liked the rhyme.

Comment is about Faulty (blog)

Original item by alan barlow

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Ian Whiteley

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 20:23

superb - tonally very similar to the 'I was there' authenticity of the original war poets. the final two lines NEED to remain as they are - not watered down as MC suggests - if we do not challenge individual's mindless prattle then we have learnt nothing at all.
I doff my hat to you sir!
Ian

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Starfish

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 20:17

I found this very moving - a wonderful tribute to your father - a poem for a poet.

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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M.C. Newberry

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 19:25

I looked up the words attributed to Michael Gove
and his main point seems to be that it is too
easy to believe the revisionist views of that
horrendous conflict - the first real example of
impersonal industrial warfare whose generals on
both sides were completely untrained and experienced in such things, still trapped in an
era of cavalry charges. Like their subordinates
they had to adapt as best they could in a series of hideously costly examples of attrition.
But the fact was that the war was the fault of an expansionist Germany, intent on making itself
felt in invasive influence across much of the
western hemisphere. A young Adolf Hitler was
with the German army and his determination to avenge German defeat was a decisive factor in his own participation in yet another attempt by
Germany to seek a dominant role in world affairs. It is part of the mentality - set out
in the Prussian tome "On War" which gives a huge insight into the pervading mentality - e.g. what
can't be had by peaceful means is to be won
in war - with the two interchangeable where
necessary.
That this occurred twice within 25 years means it's hardly a slur on the country or its
people...merely the thinking made manifest.
My father's generation was of different stuff
and many went off to fight because they had an
idea of what Germany was up to and had a fierce
belief in themselves and their country. Many
were old pals regiments, fighting and dying
together - and inordinately proud of "The old Empire" and what Britain represented in their world.
There is a place fought for by the Devonshire Regiment, with grievous losses that was marked with the words: "The Devonshires held this trench. The Devonshires hold it still".
Very matter of fact - with pride before self-pity...as was their style. God bless them.
Lest we forget.

Comment is about A Centenary War Poem for my father Bill Baine (1899-1968) (blog)

Original item by Attila the Stockbroker

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Ian Whiteley

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 16:33

thanks for commenting on 'grievous angel' Alan- glad you liked it - much appreciated
Ian

Comment is about alan barlow (poet profile)

Original item by alan barlow

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alan barlow

Thu 23rd Jan 2014 15:56

thanks, very much appreciate it im still learning and hope i continue for many a year to come thank you for your input

Comment is about Faulty (blog)

Original item by alan barlow

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